Every Second Breath

Featured

Panel made as a gift to the Center for Biological Diversity. Wode died damask tablecloth background, Appliqued fabric and lace remnants, embroidery and beading. Much of the fabric was a donation from The Universal Studios Costume shop, remnant fabric from the movie 47 Ronan.

Panel made as a gift to the Center for Biological Diversity. Wode died damask tablecloth background, appliqued fabric and lace remnants, embroidery and beading. Much of the fabric was a donation from The Universal Studios Costume shop, remnant fabric from the movie 47 Ronin.

The amazing colors of the remnant silk fabrics made me think of the incredible beauty of coral reefs. Knowing that coral reefs are in danger from ocean acidification and warming waters I wanted to make a panel about the importance of coral reefs to each and every one of us, ‘Every Second Breath” is the result.

DSC_0338 DSC_0359 DSC_0369 DSC_0316 DSC_0314Here is a link to the Center for Biological Diversity Oceans page: http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/programs/oceans/

Western Lowland Gorilla

Western Lowland Gorilla by Rosalind Cuneo. Hand painted muslin.

Western Lowland Gorilla by Rosalind Cuneo. Hand painted muslin. This panel is dedicated to the memory of Juma.

The Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) is the smaller of two western gorilla subspecies. They live in dense rain forests and swamps of Central Africa in troops of up to 30 individuals. They are listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List. To learn more about the Western Lowland Gorilla go to:

http://www.worldwildlife.org/species/western-lowland-gorilla

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/lowland-gorilla

https://www.stlzoo.org/animals/abouttheanimals/mammals/lemursmonkeysapes/westernlowlandgorilla/

https://www.stlzoo.org/about/blog/2015/09/16/juma-gorilla-leader-lover-legacy

Snow Leopard

Snow Leopard by Kelly S and her children Simon (9) and Pia (7). Hand stitched and appliquéd.

We were incredibly excited recently, when we received a panel in the mail. Here its is, a Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia). Snow Leopards live in the mountain ranges of central and southern Asia. Their habitat is currently threatened by climate change, and they are listed a endangered by the IUCN Redlist.

Here are some more photos.

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To learn more about Snow Leopards visit : http://www.worldwildlife.org/species/snow-leopard

Mohave Fringed-Toed Lizard

Mohave Fringed-Toed Lizard by Rebecca C, Daniel F, David F, and Liam H, Ms Harada's 6th grade class 2014, Thomas Starr King Middle School. Painted vinyl and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps

Mohave Fringed-Toed Lizard by Rebecca C, Daniel F, David F, and Liam H.  Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Painted vinyl and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps

The Mohave Fringed-Toed Lizard (Uma scoparia) is indigenous to the desert regions of Southern California, specifically areas of fine, wind blown sand. Scales along the edges of their feet (fringes) help them to run at high speeds. To escape predators they run on their hind legs and then dive into the sand, burying themselves about 2 1/2″ below ground.  Unfortunately this doesn’t protect them from off road vehicles which can run them over and also destroy the vegetation which they rely upon.

To learn more about the Mohave Fringe-Toed Lizard go to:

http://www.californiaherps.com/lizards/pages/u.scoparia.html

http://www.basinandrangewatch.org/SandLizards.html

For information on the Center for Biological Diversity’s petition for endangered species status go to:

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/reptiles/Mojave_fringe-toed_lizard/

For the response from the NFWS to the Center for Biological Diversity’s petition for endangered species status go to:

http://www.fws.gov/cno/press/release.cfm?rid=276

Peregrin Falcon

Peregrin Falcon by Marc C, Daniella M, James M, Marshall S, Ms Harada's 6th grade class 2014, Thomas Starr King Middle School. Painted falcon appliquéd onto fabric with rubber stamps.

Peregrin Falcon by Marc C, Daniella M, James M, and Marshall S.  Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Painted falcon appliquéd onto fabric with rubber stamps.

The Peregrin Falcon (Falco peregrinus) is a great example of an endangered species success story. The Peregrin Falcon came close to becoming extinct due to the use of DDT and other  pesticides from the 1950s through the 1970s. It was one of the first species named to the Endangered Species Act. The banning of DDT in the 1970s and captive breading programs helped the Peregrin Falcon population rebound, and it was removed from the Endangered Species act in 1999.

To learn more about the Peregrin Falcon go to:

http://www.defenders.org/peregrine-falcon/basic-facts

 http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/birds/peregrine-falcon/

http://www.peregrinefund.org/explore-raptors-species/Peregrine_Falcon#sthash.4VNDk64g.dpbs

http://articles.latimes.com/1987-03-18/sports/sp-7751_1_peregrine-falcon

For video of a Peregrin Falcon at top speed go to:

http://www.wimp.com/peregrinefalcon/

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark by John D, Bharath J, Jason L, and Diego R. Ms Harad's 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Painted and embroidered fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark by John D, Bharath J, Jason L, and Diego R.  Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Painted and embroidered fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

The Scalloped Hammerhead Shark (Sphyrna lewini) is classified as endangered by the IUCN Red list. Populations of Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks have dropped as much as 95% in the last 30 years, primarily because Scalloped Hammerheads are the shark most commonly caught for shark fin soup.  Increasingly, there is a call to ban ‘shark finning’; a practice where the fins of live sharks are cut off and the sharks are thrown back into the ocean to die.

To learn more about Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks go to:

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/hammerhead-shark/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scalloped-hammerheads-become-first-shark-species-on-the-u-s-endangered-species-list/

 

Orangutan

Orangutan by Julian, Susan, Helen and Britney, Ms Harada's 6th grade class 2014, Thomas Starr King Middle School. Paint, faux fur, and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

Orangutan by  Britney B, Helen B, Julian M,  and Susan Z.  Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Paint, faux fur, and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

The name Orangutan (genus Pongo) means ‘person of the forest’ in Malay. Orangutans are great apes living in the rain forests of Borneo and Sumatra. They are among the most intelligent of primates with incredibly advanced use of tools. Orangutans spend as much as 90% of their lives in trees, and are therefore extremely susceptible to deforestation and habitat loss. Other threats to the Orangutan include poaching and the illegal pet trade.

To learn more about the Orangutan go to:

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/orangutan/

http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/great_apes/orangutans/

http://www.orangutan.com

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/center/articles/2013/bbc-news-07-18-2013.html

http://orangutan.org/take-action/join-our-network/

 

Black Rhino

Black Rhino by Andrew, Jonathan, Juliana, Patricia, and Cynthia. Ms Harada's 6th grade class, 2014, Thomas Starr King Middle School. Fabric and faux fur appliqué, with embroidery and rubber stamps.

Black Rhino by Andrew A, Cynthia A,  Jonathan G, Juliana P,  and Patricia W.  Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Fabric and faux fur appliqué, with embroidery and rubber stamps.

The Black Rhino (Diceros bicornis) is classified as critically endangered, with the Western subspecies of Black Rhino declared extinct in 2011. The greatest threat to Black Rhinos is the illegal market in rhinoceros horn. Under CITES appendix 1, the trade in rhino horn has been illegal since 1977. But the demand is still great, with China being the largest importer.

To learn more about the Black Rhino go to:

http://www.worldwildlife.org/species/black-rhino

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/black-rhinoceros/

http://www.savetherhino.org/rhino_info/species_of_rhino/black_rhinos

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/9525512/Rhinos-under-24-hour-armed-guard.html

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/03/rhino-wars/gwin-text

To help Black Rhinos in Africa go to:

http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

For WWF’S Hands Off My parts page go to:

http://www.worldwildlife.org/pages/hands-off-my-parts

Townsends Big-Eared Bat

Townsend's Big-Earred Bat by Lindsay, Kasey, Sebastian, and Daniel. Ms Harada's 6th grade class, 2014, Thomas Starr King Middle School. Faux fur and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat by Lindsay, Kasey P, Sebastian B, and Daniel. Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King Middle School, 2014. Faux fur and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus townsendii) is a medium sized bat with large ears native to North America. Their population has been declining due to habitat loss, and disturbance of caves, roosts, etc. They have recently been named as a candidate for the California State Endangered Species Act.

To learn more about the Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat go to:

https://www.desertmuseum.org/kids/bats/townsends.php

http://www.nps.gov/chis/naturescience/townsends-bats.htm

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2013/townsends-big-eared-bat-06-27-2013.html

http://batcon.org/index.php/media-and-info/bats-archives.html?task=viewArticle&magArticleID=378

Golden Lion Tamarin

Golden Lion Tamarin by Thomas, Tony, Duane, and Shani. Ms Harada's 6th grade class, 2014, Thomas Starr king Middle School. Faux fur, and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

Golden Lion Tamarin by Thomas M, Tony P, Shani S, Duanne T. Ms Harada’s 6th grade class, Thomas Starr King, 2014. Faux fur, and fabric appliqué with rubber stamps.

The Golden Lion Tamarin  (Leontopithecus rosalia) is listed as endangered on the IUCN Red list. There are around 1,000 living in the wild and close to 500 in zoos and captive breeding programs worldwide. Deforestation is the major threat, as their original habitat has been reduced to less than 10% of its original area.

To learn more about the Golden Lion Tamarin go to:

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/golden-lion-tamarin/

http://www.arkive.org/golden-lion-tamarin/leontopithecus-rosalia/

http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/teacher_resources/best_place_species/back_from_the_brink/golden_lion_tamarin.cfm